Life Without

Simple life on the plains

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so garden bluh

To put it bluntly, my garden got fucked this year. As the season winds down, I always take the time to reflect on the year’s successes and failures, and begin plans for the next season. For whomever may be counting, here’s the roll:
Grape & Cherry tomatoes: fuck yea. huge production, bountiful. no disease. saving seed. can you say pico de gallo?
Navaho Peppers: bountiful. no problems.
Pole beans, noodle beans, bush beans - horrible season. low production. bean curl. plant rust. grasshoppers tore them up too. disaster.
Carrots: temps got too hot too fast. we’ll see if any develop this fall.
Beets: abysmal, as usual.
Greens: again, the temperatures didn’t cooperate. too much heat too early in the year.
Sunchokes: good yield til I fucked em up.
Herbs: HA! well, in all fairness, most were in the latter biennial year, so they went to seed. not a total loss.
Strawberries: wood lice obliterated.
Horseradish: high yield.
All melons & squash: grasshoppers ate through all seedlings and the few plants that managed to survive, excepting the mexican gherkin, which was great, but less useful.
Turnips, rutabaga, parsnip, radishes: pests and poor climate conditions led to poor outcome.
Eggplant - didn’t get established before the heat and drought took its toll.
Fruit trees: not old enough to bear fruit.
Cactus: died. from heat. how the fuck.
Leeks: death.
Egyptian walking onions: doing very, very well. imagine that.
Asparagus: will get to eat next year. they’ll be 4 yrs!

From this list, you can tell that I have very little of the long storage items (winter squash, tubers, root crops) to hold me through winter. Hopefully a good snow in December will bring me some early chickweed. Until then, I dine on indoor sprouts and lots and lots of beans! A very kind neighbor has a few egg laying chickens on his farmstead. He has offered me eggs this winter, and I graciously accepted.

Filed under gardening woes crop tally diary gardening crops country great plains lifestyle hippylife hippy

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It has been two weeks since I took on a second job. The exhaustion has set in. I woke long before dawn to pick tomatoes in the frigid darkness. After grabbing a jacket, a cup of coffee, and my backpack, I skittered through the alleys of town to put up new stock before the store opened. I dined on a wild sour apple that I picked from a tree along the way.

Long, boring, thoughtless hours. When afternoon came, I could scarcely stay awake. Job number two began in the evening, just before the supper rush. I dashed from table to table, fetching beer, taking food orders.

I smell of old fryer oil and Coors light that I dumped on my shoes. My hair feels dirty. My legs ache.

I have nothing left. I walked home in silence, stumbling through the dimly-lit country streets. What I wouldn’t give for a Marlboro. Thankfully, it is too late, and a 45 mile walk to the nearest open store is out of question.

I’m too tired to finish this post. In conclusion. FUck it. going to sleep.

Filed under diary life daily life work too much trying to make it

379 notes

Changing

spread-meditation:

As a westerner, we are told from a very young age that we are “perfect as we are” and that we do not need to ever change. As a practicing Buddhist, we know this is not true. We are far from perfect. We are riddled with flaws and imperfections. But yet, we live in a world where we want the whole…

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The coyotes were lively last night. I danced through an hour of solid yipping melancholy, each shriek answered with a chorus of pups’ coos. It was finally cold enough last night that the locals fired up their hardwood stoves, and the aroma sunk into the stillness beneath a fading orange sky. Fall in the plains.

Filed under Fall outdoors nature

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greedygardener:

As the last tomatoes of the year ripen on a tray in the greenhouse, I’m saving some seed for next year. Not only is it cheaper so use your own seed but a lot of the varieties I grow are heritage varieties and are difficult or even impossible to buy.  My method isn’t very high tech or complicated, just squash some seeds onto a piece of kitchen roll and hang up to dry. If you spread the seeds out you could even plant the whole sheet in a seed tray next spring. Don’t forget that F1 hybrids don’t come true from seed so if you save those, you’ll get all sorts of crazy stuff, which may or may not be a good thing.

greedygardener:

As the last tomatoes of the year ripen on a tray in the greenhouse, I’m saving some seed for next year. Not only is it cheaper so use your own seed but a lot of the varieties I grow are heritage varieties and are difficult or even impossible to buy.
My method isn’t very high tech or complicated, just squash some seeds onto a piece of kitchen roll and hang up to dry. If you spread the seeds out you could even plant the whole sheet in a seed tray next spring. Don’t forget that F1 hybrids don’t come true from seed so if you save those, you’ll get all sorts of crazy stuff, which may or may not be a good thing.

3 notes

tangledwing:

Sara Orangetip or Pacific Orangetip (Anthocharis sara). Alaska coast south to Baja California mainly to west of Pacific divide.Upperside of male forewing with large, orange-red spot; border of apex dark, narrow. Female spot smaller; dark border with white wedges. Adults feed on flower nectar, including that of host mustards, thistles, fiddleneck, and brodiaeas. Photos via  Lon&Queta and Don Loarie.

432 notes

simplelivingfarm:

browngirlfarming:

I’m back ya’ll! And The Color of Food book is ready for pre-orders! 
I have been on radio silence and under the radar all summer working to finish this amazing book of stories and portraits from farmers of color across the country. (And also moving across states, pulling off a DIY wedding and getting married! whew!) But I’m back and have big news: the Release Date for the Book is April 10, 2015!
And You Can Pre-Order Your Copy Today!! 
:)
Look out for a lot more from me to come!

Can’t wait for this!

Interesting

simplelivingfarm:

browngirlfarming:

I’m back ya’ll! And The Color of Food book is ready for pre-orders! 

I have been on radio silence and under the radar all summer working to finish this amazing book of stories and portraits from farmers of color across the country. (And also moving across states, pulling off a DIY wedding and getting married! whew!) But I’m back and have big news: the Release Date for the Book is April 10, 2015!

And You Can Pre-Order Your Copy Today!! 

:)

Look out for a lot more from me to come!

Can’t wait for this!

Interesting